Friday, June 15, 2007

The blog celebrates its 2000th visitor!


I'm delighted to announce that at seven minutes past two this afternoon, the I Hate First Great Western blog received its 2,000th visitor. I'd like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who's visited the site, ordered badges, and made helpful comments (I sound like I'm making an Oscars speech). And, to mark this momentous occasion, I'd also like to thank the 2000th visitor with a bottle of bubbly. So, if it was you, get in touch. This is all I know about you - you appear to work at Star House in Maidenhead, according to your IP address, and you spent 32 minutes on the site, finding it through a Google search at 2.07pm on Friday the 15th of June and exiting by clicking on the link to a BBC story called "Rail passengers want lower fares". Is this you? Can you prove it by visiting the blog again from the same IP address and then e-mailing me your details to IHateFGW@yahoo.co.uk? If you can, I'll reward you with not only champagne, but your very own shiny I Hate First Great Western badge, you lucky lucky person.

4 comments:

I hate FGW said...

Congratulations to Simon, who has revealed himself to be the 2000th visitor! Badge on its way to you.

I hate FGW said...

I haven't dodged the champagne issue, just waiting to find out what Simon would prefer as an alternative, as he is not a drinker. Perhaps chocolate would be more acceptable, or I could engrave a small plaque, just let me know!

Anonymous said...

Can't you arrange for Simon to be awarded a rail franchise. I hear that they are a licence to print money (he don't even need to know anything about how to run a railway)

I hate FGW said...

Actually I think I'd like a rail franchise too. I would add carriages with "perches" instead of seats, like they have at the end of tube carriages. You could fit loads of them in a carriage, and it's miles better than standing. I'd also spend less time extending the penalty fare zone, and more time trying to work out how to get the trains not to break down, so the services can run on time. Then I'd personally invent signals that didn't fail so often, and tracks that wouldn't crack and, bob's your uncle, the system works. Somehow I feel it's probably not that easy, but hey, I'd give it a go.